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jobs description

Result of Service
Specific tasks to be performed by the consultant: Under the supervision of the Head of the Research and Awareness Unit of UNODC-ROSEN and in close cooperation with the assigned staff of the Research and Awareness Unit and Research and Trend Analysis Branch, the consultant will undertake the following activities: 1. Literature review: Conduct an in-depth review of existing literature and available data on crimes in the fishery sector, aiming to critically assess the current state of research in this field. This review should not only summarize the key findings and methodologies employed in previous studies but also identify existing gaps and areas that require further investigation. By doing so, the review will establish a foundation for the research proposal, positioning it within the broader academic discourse and highlighting its unique contribution to addressing unresolved questions in the study of crimes in the fishery sector. 2. Research proposition and... methodology in line with the RAB Research Output Preparation Sheet (in English or French). 3. Mapping of key stakeholders: Identify national structures responsible for the collection of data on crimes in the fishery sector in collaboration with regional partners such as Sub Regional Fisheries Commission (SRFC), ECOWAS and FAO. 4. Legal review of national and regional laws and regulations on illegal fishing practices and associated activities (money laundering, document, tax, and customs fraud, etc) in Cape Verde, The Gambia, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Mauritania, Senegal, and Sierra Leone. 5. Data needs assessment: Assess data from various sources for a comprehensive understanding of crimes in the fishery sector, particularly SRFC and FAO. This includes official data from customs and law enforcement agencies, which provide insights into IUU, seizures and routes; court and police records detailing criminal proceedings and offender profiles; and data on illicit flows related to the fishery sector such as money laundering, tax evasion, corruption, financing of crime and terrorism. Additionally, data on fish stocks and marine biodiversity is crucial for understanding environmental impacts. It is essential to identify specific national, regional, and international agencies holding this data, and establish protocols for data access. The consultant will develop criteria for assessing data quality and harmonization, ensuring reliability and comparability. The data collection and analysis methodology, involving statistical and comparative methods, should be outlined in the data needs assessment. 6. Regional capacity-building and data-collection workshop: Experience sharing on identification, classification, and detection of crimes in the fishery sector (challenges, opportunities and best practices). Experience sharing on data production and collection skills. Data crunching exercise with Member States focal points on crimes in the fishery sector with national focal points and the Sub-Regional Fisheries Commission (SRFC) to produce/collect data, to adopt a common research methodology and to collectively produce knowledge.

Work Location
Home-based with duty travels to Senegal (estimated travel dates 15 of July to 31 of July)

Expected duration
April - July 2024

Duties and Responsibilities
Background of the assignment: Fishing is a strategic sector for West African countries, integral to their economies and livelihoods. According to FAO, the value added by the fisheries and aquaculture sector as a whole in 2011 was estimated at more than US$ 24.0 billion, 1.26 percent of the GDP of all African countries. In West Africa fishing activities, mostly in the marine artisanal subsector, are a major contributor to GDP with high overall contributions in Ghana, Mauritania and Sierra Leone. FAO also estimated that in the continent the fisheries and aquaculture sector employs about 12.3 million people . However, the region is grappling with various forms of crimes in the fisheries sector. These include illegal fishing practices that contravene national and regional laws and regulations, and crimes in the fisheries value chain such as corruption, money laundering, document, tax, and customs fraud, as well as crimes associated with the fisheries sector, including drug trafficking with fishing boats and trafficking in persons on fishing boats – many of which are tied to organized crime. These crimes have substantial impact on stability and development in the region. The Sub-Regional Fisheries Commission estimated in 2014 that the annual value of illegal catches in West Africa is in the order of USD 500 million and competition overfishing stocks fuels violence between communities and with law enforcement authorities, particularly at borders. In the fight against crimes in the fishery sector, leveraging data as a strategic asset is paramount to crafting evidence-based, impactful, and sustainable responses. The collection and analysis of data underpin the development of targeted interventions that accurately address the multifaceted challenges posed by crimes in the fishery sector. Research plays a crucial role in this endeavour, offering a foundation upon which policies and interventions can be constructed with precision and relevance. By producing comprehensive datasets—ranging from catch volumes and fishing efforts to patterns of illicit activities—stakeholders can identify vulnerabilities within fisheries management systems, evaluate the effectiveness of existing regulations, and forecast future trends in illegal fishing practices. This approach ensures that responses are not only grounded in the reality of current practices but are also adaptable to evolving threats, thus enhancing the resilience and sustainability of fisheries management efforts. Ultimately, treating data as a strategic asset empowers policymakers, enforcement agencies, and community stakeholders to deploy resources more efficiently, enact measures that directly address the root causes of crimes in the fishery sector, and foster a culture of compliance that protects marine resources for future generations. This project aims to answer the following question: How does illegal fishing affect stability and development in West Africa? Markets • What are the different criminal markets associated with the fishery sector (IUU, money laundering, trafficking of firearms and drugs on fishing vessels, human trafficking, etc.)? • What is the nature of the markets (routes, scale of the flow based on seizures, estimated value of the flow, etc.)? • How do groups involved in this market organize themselves and what kind of modus operandi do they use? • What are the specific locations where such offenses are most prevalent? • What are the state structures and existing responses to this market? Perpetrators • Who are the actors involved on the different criminal markets associated with the fishery sector (e.g. age, gender, nationality, ethnicity, level of education, criminal history, relationship with corporations, transnational criminal groups, etc.)? • What is their connection, if any, with armed groups operating in the region? Enablers • How do organized criminal groups facilitate their activities through corruption, obstruction of justice and violence? Policy implications • How do crimes in the fishery sector impact the livelihoods of local communities? • How do crimes in the fishery sector impact trust in the social and political system ? • How do crimes in the fishery sector contribute to or exacerbate existing conflicts in the region ? • Based on evidence/good practices or lessons learnt, how can national authorities and sub-regional organizations such as the Sub-Regional Fisheries Commission (SRFC), more effectively prevent and combat crimes in the fishery sector ? • Based on evidence/good practices or lessons learnt, how can policy efforts be further advanced to promote resilience and effective responses to such challenges? The purpose of this assignment is to produce a reliable and official data-set on crimes in the fisheries sector. This entails documenting a range of illegal activities, from licensing violations and illegal fishing methods to broader criminal activities including corruption, money laundering, fraud in documents, taxes, and customs, as well as drug trafficking and human trafficking on fishing vessels. The comprehensive dataset aims to offer an in-depth view into the diverse crimes affecting the sector. The dataset will cover information from Cape Verde, The Gambia, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Mauritania, Senegal, and Sierra Leone. This project aims to shed light on the nature of the market, the involved actors, and the main factors facilitating these activities, as well as the socioeconomic and environmental impact on the region. Sources for this study will include official data from customs and law enforcement agencies, offering insights into seizures and routes; court and police records to detail criminal proceedings and offender profiles; and data on illicit flows in the fishery sector. Information on fish stocks and marine biodiversity will also be crucial for understanding environmental and socio-economic impacts.

Qualifications/special skills
An advanced university degree (Master’s degree or equivalent) in sociology, criminology, maritime law, environmental law, international relations, development studies, economics, data science, statistics, social sciences or related field is required. A first level university degree in similar fields in combination with two additional years of qualifying experience may be accepted in lieu of the advanced university degree. • A minimum of 7 years of relevant working experience in designing and conducting research and analysis on topics related to maritime law or criminality is required. • Experience in comparative research and analysis of quantitative crime-related data is required. • Experience working on crimes in the fishery sector is required. • Experience working with remote sensing and tracing technologies is required. • Previous relevant experience with the United Nations is desirable, especially producing threat assessments and analytical publications according to UN standards.

Languages
English and French are the working languages of the United Nations Secretariat. For this position, fluency in English and French, with excellent drafting and communication skills, is required. Fluency in Portuguese, with excellent drafting and communication skills, is desirable.

Additional Information
Not available.

No Fee
THE UNITED NATIONS DOES NOT CHARGE A FEE AT ANY STAGE OF THE RECRUITMENT PROCESS (APPLICATION, INTERVIEW MEETING, PROCESSING, OR TRAINING). THE UNITED NATIONS DOES NOT CONCERN ITSELF WITH INFORMATION ON APPLICANTS’ BANK ACCOUNTS
Vienna Austria

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Apply - Research Consultant (crimes in the fishery sector) Vienna